Sunday, August 20, 2017

Monday, April 17, 2017

Forthcoming experimental/computational number theory book: Sequential Experiments with Primes (Springer 2017 - by Mihai Caragiu)

Forthcoming book:
Sequential Experiments with Primes © 2017

http://www.springer.com/us/book/9783319567617

Presents experimental and computational number theory in a new and interesting context
Offers new mathematical ideas and problems involving prime numbers and related sequences
Perfect for graduate and advanced undergraduate students studying applied and computational number theory

Due: July 26, 2017
ISBN 978-3-319-56762-4

With a specific focus on the mathematical life in small undergraduate colleges, this book presents a variety of elementary number theory insights involving sequences largely built from prime numbers and contingent number-theoretic functions. Chapters include new mathematical ideas and open problems, some of which are proved in the text. Vector valued MGPF sequences, extensions of Conway’s Subprime Fibonacci sequences, and linear complexity of bit streams derived from GPF sequences are among the topics covered in this book. This book is perfect for the pure-mathematics-minded educator in a small undergraduate college as well as graduate students and advanced undergraduate students looking for a significant high-impact learning experience in mathematics.

Mihai Caragiu is a professor of mathematics at Ohio Northern University. He is the recipient of the 2010 Outstanding Teaching Faculty Award for the Department of Mathematics and Statistics.

Wednesday, November 2, 2016

The amazing Grothendieck's view on research...

I am not really doing research, just trying to cultivate myself.
Alexander Grothendieck (1928–2014)

Sunday, March 27, 2016

An amazing "prime conspiracy" discovered by Lemke Oliver and Soundararajan

QUANTA MAGAZINE / Number Theory
Mathematicians Discover Prime Conspiracy
A previously unnoticed property of prime numbers seems to violate a longstanding assumption about how they behave. 

Terrence Tao: Biases between consecutive primes 
https://terrytao.wordpress.com/2016/03/14/biases-between-consecutive-primes

Lemke Oliver and Soundararajan  ArXiv article
http://arxiv.org/abs/1603.03720

Richard Feynman: 'Greek' versus 'Babylonian' mathematics LIVE

Mathematics as Hidden Reality - Edward Frenkel

"There's a secret world out there. A hidden parallel universe of beauty and elegance, intricately intertwined with ours. And it's invisible to most of us."

Imagine that you had to take an art class in which they taught you only how to paint a fence or a wall, but never showed you the paintings of the great masters. Alas, this is how math is taught, and so for most of us it becomes the intellectual equivalent of watching paint dry. Edward Frenkel wants to open this secret world to all of us because it can teach us so much about the mysteries of the Universe. In this talk, he weaves the discovery of math with his personal journey, addressing the existential questions of finding out who we are; of truth, courage, and passion.

Edward Frenkel is a professor of mathematics at the University of California, Berkeley, which he joined in 1997 after being on the faculty at Harvard University. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a Fellow of the American Mathematical Society, and the winner of the Hermann Weyl Prize in mathematical physics. Frenkel has authored three books and over eighty scholarly articles in academic journals, and he has lectured on his work around the world. His YouTube videos have garnered over 3 million views combined.

Frenkel’s latest book "Love and Math" was a New York Times bestseller and has been named one of the Best Books of 2013 by both Amazon and iBooks. It is being translated into 14 languages. Frenkel has also co-produced, co-directed and played the lead in the film "Rites of Love and Math" (2010).

http://edwardfrenkel.com

Edward Frenkel: Let's Stop Hating Math

Saturday, February 27, 2016

primes as "experimental data"...

"Although the prime numbers are rigidly determined, they somehow feel like experimental data." 
T. Gowers, "Mathematics: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford Univ. Press, 2002) p.118 (apud source)